H A P P E N I N G S


DURAN LANTINK X BATAVIASTAD
CO-DESIGNED COLLECTION
SHOWED AT AMSTERDAM FASHION WEEK
SEP 2019

See the show here
and Duran’s insta here


JWLZ FUR FRENDZ

CREATING O’NEILL JUNGLEROOM WITH DEAREST DURAN LANTINK
MAY2018


WHEN MY WALL KINDLY ASKED FOR A FRIENDSHIP WITH THE INDIGO PONCHO


COSTUME DESIGN FOR THE SEAFROTH KNOWS NEITHER PAIN NOR TIME 2017
A PERFORMANCE BY ANHTONY NESTEL


CHRISTINA IN COSTUME
soon to be seen in Anthony Nestel’s performance


SHAKESPEARENL EXHIBITION ALLARD PIERSON MUSEUM AMSTERDAM 2016
costume installation

Costumes by Rien Bekkers
Set design by Stefan Voets


TAILORING AT CAMP RITZ
Greece 2016

Tailoring at Camp Ritz

Ritsona Greece / 2016 Tailoring the donated clothes as a response to the heat of the environment that everybody in the camp was beginning to suffer from due to a lack of such summer clothes.

The second time I visited Ritsona’s refugee camp to volunteer, I soon noticed a lack of summer’s clothes (especially for men) in the warehouse; the camp’s version of clothing shopping. The heat was already unbearable at times and summer had not even begun its full glory…
There was an overload of donated winter clothes, so I reckoned: why not tailor what there is into summer variations?!


THE ISLAND RESIGNIFIED
Artist residency Leukada / Greece 2016
curated by Dimitra Kondylatou

The Island Resignified
Dimitra Kondilatou’s website

July, 2016. Much like a tourist I encountered the island of Lefkada and perceived its world as a Greek / Dutch young woman, who has lived predominantly in The Netherlands and has a background in fashion design.

I came driven to discover the origin of the local way of dressing and how their fashion was related to their customs and values.

THE WEDDING DRESS1
Lefkada was colonized by the Venetians between 1779 and 1864. During this time a dress being the colonial fashion was appropriated as the local wedding dress and became a tradition, that is still perceived as a cultural landmark. Its symbol for a woman’s dignity and modesty. Lefkadians are proud of this piece of heritage; proud of the tradition that has immortalized a flux of fashion.

WOMEN’S ECONOMY
By the end of the 19th century many local women embroidered2. Around 1950 a market was developed that provided the woman an economic independence. It allowed her to lead a life of her own, away from the fields. This led to the creation of a new culture; child care, housekeeping and sewing were developed further. This phenomenon lasted until the 1980s, when the micro-financial climate drastically changed for everyone due to tourism.

CRISIS OF VALUES
Through tourism the island was exposed to the needs, expectation and labour of international guests. The tourist’s leisure lifestyle was increasingly perceived as a new norm or standard of life to mimic: one moves outdoors to find the good stuff and good times. The tourist’s life was perceived as cooler and cooler than the locals’ own ways of living and perhaps locals had grown tireder and tireder of their own traditions.

I can’t help but link the two: appropriation of a form (the wedding dress) and appropriation of a behavior (the mimical response of tourism). What is their actual difference?

My time in Lefkada showed me that some customs, and perhaps even values, can originate from very random reasoning and decision making.
That which makes a difference is how one wishes to relate to these customs and values.

THE PHYSICAL WORK
A childish curiosity to play around with the peculiar shape of the breasts in Lefkada’s weddingdress gave birth to a premature summer top. I used the local embroidery (this time not as a tablecloth, which sadly is seen as its sole purpose) to embellish the top.

1 A grand expression of imposing presence, emphasising the bride’s importance and her unapologetic pride. The dress celebrates, tones and overexaggerates the feminine curves, defining the hourglass’ shape. From top to floor, one’s gaze glides down over the cataractic silk headscarf, framing the bride’s face in white; reaching the turgid, puffy shoulders, of which the overcoat is short sleeved and golden rimmed; the big in white contrasting angular breasts, the fine waistline, the golden embroidery and finally the widening of the voluminous dress down to the floor in shimmering silk. These are the general outlines of each wedding dress that establish its formula of uniformity. Within this fixed frame, there are variables, such as the dress’ fixed colorpalet; sea blue, eggplant purple, dark cherry red and olive green. The adornment of golden jewellery pieces is another variable, such as golden pins and chains to bejewel the spaleta, a fine necklace with a cross hanger and golden earrings. The latter add a layer of the bride’s personality, though surely one that may also show off her family’s status. 

2 In the style of the famous Karsaniko stitch. Flowers, trees, leaves and birds depicted the abstract embroidery designs. Its extraordinary feature is that front and back of the embroidery are exactly the same. The stitch was developed by the end of the 19th century by Maria Koutsoherou and it became a tradition. Maria had experienced an accident that had left her invalid with just her left arm to use. By the time she was nineteen she had a vision, namely, the sky opened up to her and a tree ablaze fell from the heavens. A voice told her she should go to the village and teach the girls to embroider, in the manner of the older days. Ever since she had been devoted to her divine mission.

Model Myrthe Platenkamp


SISTAAZ OF THE CASTLE
DURAN LANTINK X JAN HOEK 2016


HAVING FUN IN 2015


SWING / GINY VOS

Zomeren op de buitenplaats – Beeckestein 2014
Een dwaze zomer op Huize Frankendael – Amsterdam 2015


Featured in the fabulous TOFU magazine 2014
– The Organic Fashion Utopia – by Manuela Marini Tan

theorganicfashionutopia.net
Rings from the ORAMA collection

and 
trousers


COPPER CAMP 2014


GO FOR GOLD 2013

Greek silk, saffron dyed scarf


HAELMAS WITH TAKA TAKA 2012
performance still


RIETVELD STUDY SWINGS
props by Taka Taka